Tag Archive | history

Canal Stone history

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Yesterday, I went to go talk to Michael McWilliams about the Fort Augusta model at the Northumberland County Historical Society headquarters, but I was also able to see a stone that offers a unique view of history: a canal stone from the Hummel’s Wharf lock, carved in 1829.

It was donated to the Historical Society in the 1930s and placed in a flower bed, but the stone began to sink because of its weight, and it was buried about halfway up.

Now, the Historical Society has raised the stone and it is able to be fully enjoyed.

It has the engineers on the lock and it is dated.

Pretty cool stuff.

Stop by and see the stone and the Fort Augusta model when you’re in Sunbury!

Warrior Run mural project

As you must have figured out by now, I love me some murals.

And yesterday, I got to see the progress on the Warrior Run school mural, which will begin being installed next month.

The cool thing about this mural is its construction, which is through digital and tile work – very cool stuff. And the artist, Warrior Run alum Jon Laidacker, is giving a behind-the-scenes look on his Facebook page.

One thing that fascinated me was the paint-by-numbers concept he’s using to help students and community members get involved. Here’s a look at what the tiles look like after he traces them from a digital file onto a tile and numbers them by color:

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And the scale is amazing.

It’s going to be huge. Here’s a video look at the eagle, just one-fifth of the mural.

I’ll of course be keeping you updated as this progresses – check back!

Danville mural update

Work on the Danville mural continues, with many of the projects details being solidified.

I think the mural brings together many of the important aspects of the town’s history and it’s current state to create a nice picture.

Here’s a look:

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Head to the corner of Mill Street and Route 11 to check it out!

Danville mural well underway

One thing that’s got everyone in Danville excited is the new mural going up near Mill Street.

It’s being put up right now, with detail work to continue, it looks like.

I can’t wait to see it complete

It’s a history based mural, which I like because Danville does have a rich history.

Here’s a big picture, in two parts:

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Now here’s a detail shot of the flowers/person:

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Very exciting! I can’t wait to see it done!

Bonus photos: Iron Heritage Parade

I’ve spoken before about the importance of parades in small towns, and the annual Iron Heritage Festival parade is no different.

However, this year, the heat was distracting – all I could think about as I saw the parade moving down the street was, “How are they not passing out?!”

The theme was “The Civil War Years,” which means heavy hoop skirts and petticoats and wool military costumes.

It was brutal to think about.

Anyway, we were there, the Bowman family was there and we had a good time.

Here’s the photos:

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Following Gettysburg action on Twitter

One of my biggest disappointments this week is that I can’t be in Gettysburg, enjoying the celebrations for the 150th celebration.

(I mean, in a way that’s OK, because I’m sure it’s crowded, but I’d still like to be there in the middle of it).

Anyway, despite being two hours away, it’s possible to still be in the middle of the action all through the help of social media.

People are tweeting up a storm from the battlefields, and here’s some of what they have to say:

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Newspapers – Preserving family history for posterity. Just ask my dad.

Recently, my father brought home an old copy of the News Item he found in his childhood home. It was pretty cool to see how wide old newspapers were and how much things were back in the 1970s – I believe bananas were 9 cents per pound.

Here’s the front page to get a sample of how big that is:wpid-20130531_104448.jpg

That’s eight columns. Most papers today are six, and a skinny six at that in some cases.

But even though that is cool, we wondered why the newspaper had been preserved. Something special had to have happened that would cause my Mam and Pap to save the paper.

After we flipped the front page over – we didn’t have to guess any longer.

wpid-20130531_104440.jpgSee that handsome devil to the far right? That’s none other than Greg – in his about 16-year-old glory. He was newspaper boy of the year.

And he still looks exactly like that. Just with more gray hair.

So there it is, newspaper preserving these precious memories that would have been lost for all eternity – so that your kids can look back and laugh at you.

Just kidding – we only laughed a little bit…..OK, a lot.

Love you dad!

Bonus Photos: History Day

Fort Augusta in Sunbury hosted a really cool event Saturday.

History Day included a WWII camp, some cool Lincoln memorabilia, and colonial people.

Most of it was hands on, too.

The event was revived after several years of lapsing. I was there for work, but would definitely go back for fun. Anyone interested in history should check it out in coming years.

Here’s some extra photos from the WWII camp:

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You Might Have Missed It: North Shore Railroad headquarters

I love old-fashioned architecture, especially some that tells a story.

The North Shore Railroad company headquarters on Priestley Avenue in Northumberland does just that:

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The railroad station building is a great reminder of the region’s logistics and transportation roots, while emphasizing that they are still very much a part of our modern economy.

You can check out more details later this month in our Commerce section, but logitics and transportation in the area is booming. – but many don’t realize  the NSRR headquarters are there, tucked beside the river in Northumberland.

If you love railroad architecture, this is a must see.

Send me your favorite local hidden gems at awislock@dailyitem.com!

Blog showcases local history

Helena Muffly (the diary's author) in a photo from her granddaughter's blog, A Hundred Years Ago

Helena Muffly (the diary’s author) in a photo from her granddaughter’s blog, A Hundred Years Ago

I got an interesting email Tuesday from a local blogger – Sheryl Lazarus – whose blog isn’t your typical look at local history:

You might find my blog interesting. It’s called A Hundred Years Ago. I’ve been posting my grandmother’s diary entries on it exactly 100 years to the day after she wrote them. She grew up on a farm in the McEwensville-Watsontown area, and kept the diary during her teen years from 1911 to 1914. I also include background information, old-time recipes, photos from hundred-year-old magazines, and other interesting things. I’m now just past the half-way point in the diary, and have posted a diary entry for each day for the past two years.

The blog is indeed really fascinating.

Sheryl posts diary entries and then adds her own context and commentary. For example in an entry describing Helena (the diary’s author) copying a dialogue for her school’s literary society, Sheryl wonders what she was reading and posts the text of a poem that might have been on the society’s radar.

It’s a fascinating look into the history of the region.

Make sure to visit A Hundred Years Ago!

And definitely send me any links to local sites you think are worth a mention!