Tag Archive | education

Now Trending on Facebook: Do we need cursive writing?

This week on Facebook, a lot of things are blowing up, but most of all….people are arguing about cursive writing!

The Common Core standards have dropped the requirement to learn cursive writing, and people can’t decide whether they agree with that or not.

Here’s a sampling:

  • Maggie Barger: Why don’t we just stop teaching children and just let their phones iPods etc do all the work. Yes, cursive should still be taught! Maybe parents should think twice before caving in on giving their kids so much technology.
  • Jennifer Heintzelman My mom died earlier this year. She left behind journals, written in cursive. Had I not learned how to write/read in cursive, I would not have been able to read her journals, her notes left on the margins of her Bibles, and many other things left behind. There are so many things written in cursive from our history, it’s important for students now to learn cursive. Our school (Mifflinburg) teaches a little bit of it and it varies by teacher on just how much, what they haven’t learned from school, I’ve taught myself (or am teaching). It’s not just a matter of what schools are teaching, it’s ultimately the parents job to ensure that their kids have the knowledge they need. There are resources online for parents to use to teach their children if the schools aren’t.
  • Eric Adams Teaching cursive is a bit old. I can’t think of anyone who really uses it in any form of communication other then signing your name. And it would be a lot easier to teach kids how to sign their name or to create a unique signature then to spend years teaching them a completely worthless skill.

I agree with the pro-cursive camp. I use it all the time, especially when taking notes on stories.

It is so much quicker, easier and sometimes, it’s just prettier.

What do you think? Should we still teach cursive writing?

 

Neat School Security infographic

A reader sent me a link to this infographic, talking about school security, a topic I’ve followed pretty extensively.

It provides a pretty neat summary and bullet points about the challenge of security in schools and a history of violence in schools.

I think it provides some good context. It’s from Security Degree Hub:

Securing Schools
Source:

Security Degree Hub

Back to class in the Valley

Yesterday was a bittersweet milestone in my family. My baby sister, 10 years younger than me and my older sister, started her senior year of high school.

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She apparently gave my mom a hard time about taking the photo, but then after Facebook became flooded with traditional first-day pics of her classmates, posted by their moms – she calmed down.

My little girl is growing up!

If I could say one thing to her and her schoolmates, it’s: enjoy it. You can’t get it back later. And it’ll go so fast,

Have a great year to all students returning to classes’

Now Trending on Facebook: Week of August 19

This week, some statewide stories were really lighting up our Facebook page. Here’s a look at what people were talking about.

  • Pennsylvania received a waiver for parts of No Child Left Behind, something that readers had lots of thoughts on, although most said the iniative was a failure. Here’s a peek at what they had to say: Brynne Clawser - “Having graduated only 2 years ago, I feel that my hs education consisted of being taught only what would get me through the standardized testing. By the time teachers get through all that crap, theres no time to learn the things that are useful for college and life. No child left behind hasn’t done us any favors. “
  • Peopdownloadle were also VERY talkative about President Obama’s visit to Scranton – happening today.  This post was the most talked about on our page this week. Most people either railed against Obama or decried the fact that the President should be given respect, if just for the office. Take a look: Tamara Fultz - “I wish I could go. Why wouldn’t one want to hear the president of the country you live in whether you agree with his politics or not? Isn’t that part of being an informed citizen? Truly evaluating someone based on what they actually say?”
  • And finally, as Pennsylvania prepares for a landmark case involving same-sex marriage, the debate amongst commenters continues.  This was the second most talked-about issue this week.

Don’t forget to visit our Facebook page to join the discussion!

College visits in full swing for rising seniors

If, like in our family, you have a rising high school senior, you’re probably in the midst of college visits and common applications.

However, Friday, I was more than excited to be able to take my sister back to my alma mater, Lycoming College in Wiliamsport, a place that is near and dear to my heart.

Both our older sister and myself attended Lyco, and I’m hoping to make it 3/3.

She yelled at me, but I made her pose with me when we got there:20130729-085333.jpg

The rest of the time, I was simply admiring the mark my class had left on our school. It always feels nice to see that you’re not completely forgotten and feel like you’ve made some kind of impact.

Here’s our traditional signed class numbers:

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What I was most excited to see was how much use the porch furniture we gave as a class gift was being used. I was a class officer, and we really tried to pick something everyone could use and enjoy:

20130729-085350.jpgSo good luck to all college-seekers. I hope the place you pick is as good to you as Lyco continues to be to me!

Bonus Photos: Fire Cadet Weekend in Elysburg

This weekend, I worked the Saturday shift and started my day at Fire Cadet Weekend at the Elysburg Fire Department.

It’s a cool program designed to introduce teens to emergency response.

I kind of wanted to be a cadet, they got to do some cool things, like rappell, see a controlled home fire and get up close with Life Flight.

When I was there, they were learning about equipment.

Here’s some extra photos:

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Bonus photo: Chinese exchange students welcomed to Milton HS

 

 

Milton High School has really rolled out the welcome mat for a group of 10 exchange students and a teacher from China.

I got to meet them Wednesday, and it was really a lot of fun hearing first-hand about the differences between the Chinese education system and the U.S. one:

  • At Heibei Middle School, the average class size is about 60 students, the teacher said.
  • There’s no school dances in China. They have evening activities, but they all have an academic/cultural aspect to them, like art, music lessons or calligraphy.
  • Chinese students go to school year-round

And for anyone who didn’t know that Milton was hosting the students, the high school literally had a sign posted outside:

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Bonus photos: Warrior Run SB crowd

Here’s some crowd shots from the Warrior Run school board last night.

Things got really heated and  culminated in a walk out by teachers. In addition to teachers, many in the crowd were students.

I was surprised by just how many students there were … I would say at least 20-25.

Here’s my coverage of the meeting.

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Were you there? What did you think?

Art at Midd-West

Yesterday, I visited Midd-West High School to talk about raising money to bring in an artist in residence.

Budget cuts have cut funding for the program.

They’ve had an artist-in-residence come to the school during the past two years, and created some cool projects – like these low-relief sculptures which hang in the school’s lobby:

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They’re made from several different materials, including old books. Very neat.

On the way back from the interview, we were thinking about other art projects that could be in schools that wouldn’t cost too much. Statutes are expensive, but maybe one that the students create using recycled materials?

What do you think? How would you decorate a school?